The other day, Bruce Schneier had some post about securing data for border crossings and in the comments someone asked why not just use TrueCrypt’s deniable file system, which in TrueCrypt’s implementation hides an encrypted file system within a TrueCrypt encrypted volume. Schneier responded that he didn’t trust TrueCrypt’s deniable

May 29, 2006 · About Bruce Schneier. I am a public-interest technologist, working at the intersection of security, technology, and people. I've been writing about security issues on my blog since 2004, and in my monthly newsletter since 1998. I'm a fellow and lecturer at Harvard's Kennedy School and a board member of EFF. This personal website expresses the Jul 20, 2020 · About Bruce Schneier. I am a public-interest technologist, working at the intersection of security, technology, and people. I've been writing about security issues on my blog since 2004, and in my monthly newsletter since 1998. I'm a fellow and lecturer at Harvard's Kennedy School and a board member of EFF. This personal website expresses the May 29, 2014 · The TrueCrypt project abruptly imploded on Wednesday – leaving folks in the infosec world scratching heads and scrambling to recommend alternatives. In the past hour, crypto-guru Bruce Schneier has told us he's switched back to Symantec's PGPDisk to encrypt his data. Jul 17, 2008 · Schneier research team cracks TrueCrypt. Security expert Bruce Schneier says standard software such as Vista interferes with deniable file systems, designed to hide data on users' systems An anonymous reader writes "Bruce Schneier and colleagues from the University of Washington have figured out a way to break the deniability of TrueCrypt 5.1a's hidden files. What about the spanking-new TrueCrypt 6? Schneier says that 'The new version will definitely close some of the leakages, but

We’ve recommended TrueCrypt in the past; it’s a nice way to secure an entire disk, however, a team headed by our own Wired Security columnist Bruce Schneier has just released a new paper that

May 30, 2014 · The creators of the software have not been publicly identified. Edward Snowden allegedly used TrueCrypt, and security expert Bruce Schneier was another well-known supporter of the software. The Jun 02, 2014 · Since TrueCrypt announced last week that they are closing up shop, many on social media have quipped that there’s no point in completing an audit. Crypto expert Bruce Schneier noted, “Back In a paper published in 2008 and focused on the then latest version (v5.1a) and its plausible deniability, a team of security researchers led by Bruce Schneier states that Windows Vista, Microsoft Word, Google Desktop, and others store information on unencrypted disks, which might compromise TrueCrypt's plausible deniability. The study

A unique effort to crowdsource a security audit of the popular TrueCrypt open source encryption software appears to be going viral three weeks after it was launched by two U.S. based researchers

TrueCrypt; Security and Human Behavior (SHB 2014) by Bruce Schneier read by Dan Henage. Direct download: crypto-gram-13-10.mp3 Category:podcast-- posted at: 11 Mar 02, 2020 · Bruce Schneier, a leading information security researcher, has long used TrueCrypt including to safeguard the computer he uses to work on leaked NSA files. Although he’s said he prefers Jun 08, 2014 · The "TrueCrypt is insecure" message may also affect user perception or at least doubt when it comes to VeraCrypt. While the -- ongoing -- audit has not found any major security issues in its first stage, it may still keep some users from giving VeraCrypt a true, considering that it is based on the same source as TrueCrypt. This has nothing to do with XP," said Bruce Schneier, noted cryptographer and one of those involved in the TrueCrypt audit. Like many others posting on blogs and on Twitter , Schneier said he has Jun 22, 2019 · TrueCrypt alternative #1: VeraCrypt. VeraCrypt is a fork (copy) of the TrueCrypt source code that’s been taken over and continues to be maintained. As a result, its functionally extremely similar to TrueCrypt — so much so that it’s easy to mistake it for TrueCrypt itself.